Publications list

Click on the arrow on the right side of the citation to display the respective abstract. Publications are listed in reverse chronological order (i.e. most recent first). This may not be the most recent list - the publications database is updated when we have time.

The Array Network Facility: an open-source web-based toolkit for managing the USArray broadband seismic network
Newman, R. L., Vernon, F. L., Lindquist, K. G., Reyes, J., Clemesha, A. (2010)
European Seismological Commission 32 Abstract SD12-76

Since April 2004 the EarthScope USArray broadband seismic network has grown to over 900 broadband
stations. Multi-channel data streams in near real-time to the Array Network Facility (ANF) at the
Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego. Managing such a large and dynamic network
requires a robust, extensible, accessible, and easy to deploy software architecture. The ANF has
developed a series of platform agnostic low-latency web-based tools that provide secure, yet open,
access to real-time and archived data for a broad range of audiences including seismic network
operators, geoscience researchers, funding agencies and the general public. The toolset acts as a
publicly accessible interactive front-end to the Boulder Real Time Technologies Antelope
Environmental Monitoring System data acquisition and archival software middleware, and can be
deployed by any network operator that uses Antelope. Tools range from network-wide to
station-specific metadata, monitoring state-of-health metrics, event detection rates, monthly event
downloads, dynamic station report generation, and an interactive waveform server that allows uses to
directly query high density waveform data. These tools have helped the network to achieve a data
return rate of over 90% for the last 6 years. Much of the software is already freely available
fromthe Antelope contributed code Git repository (http://www.antelopeusersgroup.org).

Using Seismic Signals as a Quality Assessment Tool of USArray stations at the Array Network Facility
Astiz, L., Martynov, V. G., Vernon, F. L., Newman, R. L., Reyes, J. C., Cox, T. A., Karasu, G. H. (2009)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 90 (52) Abstract S33A-1746

Full deployment of the 400 Transportable Array (TA) stations of the USArray Earthscope project was
reached in September 2007. The original array footprint has rolled eastward at a rate of 200
stations per year. The Array Network Facility (ANF) is responsible for the delivery of all TA data
(seismic, state of health and metadata) to the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC). In addition, the
ANF provides station command and control; verification and distribution of metadata;
remotely accessible world wide web interfaces for Array Operations Facility (AOF) personnel to
access network and station state of health information; and quality control for all seismic
data. ANF seismic analysts review individual seismic events recorded by the USArray, and to-date
have produced over 2.5 million arrival picks from more than 40,000 local, regional and teleseismic
events since April 2004. In the last two years, as the TA has moved away from the seismically active
west coast of the United States, most of the local and regional events recorded are man-made events.
The arrival picks are available in IMS format at the DMC and as compressed CSS3.0
relational databases from the ANF website. The eyes-on-data approach of these seismic signals by ANF
analysts in quasi-real time allows for data quality monitoring of all deployed TA stations. This
approach also allows the ANF to quickly discover problems at the stations as the network evolves
given that the USArray currently records about 25 seismic events per day and that large
teleseismic earthquakes (M > 6.5) are recorded at nearly all USArray stations. We use an empirical
approach to compare body and surface wave recordings at a particular station with the robust stack
of the nearest neighbors recordings to monitor continuing station performance. Using this empirical
approach we will compare particle motion of P and S waves of the largest 30 shallow & deep
earthquakes recorded by USArrray stations to verify sensor orientation. We will also compare
amplitudes of long-period surface waves to monitor large amplitude differences amongst stations.

Calibration Response of the NSF EarthScope USArray Transportable Array
Vernon, F. L., Harvey, D., Eakins, J. A., Busby, R. W., Astiz, L., Newman, R. L., Reyes, J. (2009)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 90 (52) Abstract S11B-1706

The USArray Transportable Array (TA) is comprised of ~400 deployed s in a rolling layout across the
48 contiguous United States. To date, 760 s have been deployed with a Quanterra Q330 datalogger and
either a Streckeisen STS-2, a Guralp CMG3T, or a Nanometrics Trillium 240 broadband sensor. As part
of the operational procedures, a white noise calibration of at least 2 hours is performed at each
after each site is certified and before each site is removed using the standard 40 sps data streams.
Calibrations are also performed immediately before and after sensor or datalogger swaps. Results
from these calibrations are remarkably consistent within each sensor type and match the expected
response curves in normalized amplitude and phase quite well for the frequency range of 1 mHz to
16 Hz. Encouraged by these results, a special calibration of the TA was conducted by collecting an
additional 200 sps 3 channel data stream for a week in August 2009. The TA network data return for
the 200 sps calibration run was 98.7%. Using these new data, calibration response results will be
presented for all sensors for the frequency range of 0.2 mHz to 80 Hz. and provide a statistical
basis for comparison. To streamline white noise calibrations instigated by field operators, a
web-based interface has been developed that allows authenticated users to (1) view the metadata and
graphical output from the most recent calibrations carried out at a station and (2) send calibration
commands to an individual station or group of stations. The interface uses asynchronous Javascript
to dynamically send commands to the sensors via an Antelope Object Ring Buffer (ORB). In addition
the interface logs the command history and provides some intelligent feedback to the client
including disabling stations that are currently calibrating or have been queued for calibration.

NSF EarthScope USArray Transportable Array Catalog and Magnitude Comparisons
Eakins, J. A., Vernon, F. L., Astiz, L., Martynov, V. G., Cox, T. A., Newman, R. L., Davis, G. A., Battistuz, B., Reyes, J. (2009)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 90 (52) Abstract S11B-1705

One of the responsibilities of the Array Network Facility (ANF) for the Earthscope USArray
Transportable Array (TA) seismic network is analyst review of local, regional, and teleseismic
earthquakes. As the network traverses the United States, it crosses the authoritative areas
of multiple regional networks, which produce their own unique catalog or bulletin of events. Each
regional network has its own methods and rules about which magnitude type is calculated and whether
station corrections are used. In addition, the seismometers and data acquisition systems vary
between (and sometimes within) networks. Since the initial installation of TA stations in 2004,
analysts have associated >29,330 events recorded by at least one regional network, as well as
located ~15,500 events with more than 10 phase picks where no regional network solution was
available, providing over 2.63 million arrivals for >44,830 events. As part of the TA operations, a
Richter Ml is calculated for each event observed inside the footprint of the TA. Taking advantage of
the consistent and well calibrated TA equipment, we present comparisons of local magnitudes
published by each regional network to the standard Ml estimates provided by the TA. The results show
in some cases that the TA Ml results are biased when compared to the authoritative regional networks
published magnitudes. The observed biases can be caused by the regional networks using different
magnitude estimators, different stations, station corrections, path corrections, and/or regional
geological settings.

The Earthscope USArray Array Network Facility (ANF): Evolution of Data Acquisition, Processing, and Storage Systems
Davis, G. A., Battistuz, B., Foley, S., Vernon, F. L., Eakins, J. (2009)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 90 (52) Abstract IN41A-1114

Since April 2004 the Earthscope USArray Transportable Array (TA) network has grown to over 400
broadband seismic stations that stream multi-channel data in near real-time to the Array Network
Facility in San Diego. In total, over 1.7 terabytes per year of 24-bit, 40 samples-per-second
seismic and state of health data is recorded from the stations. The ANF provides analysts access to
real-time and archived data, as well as state-of-health data, metadata, and interactive tools for
station engineers and the public via a website. Additional processing and recovery of missing data
from on-site recorders (balers) at the stations is performed before the final data is transmitted to
the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC). Assembly of the final data set requires additional storage
and processing capabilities to combine the real-time data with baler data. The infrastructure
supporting these diverse computational and storage needs currently consists of twelve virtualized
Sun Solaris Zones executing on nine physical server systems. The servers are protected against
failure by redundant power, storage, and networking connections. Storage needs are provided by a
hybrid iSCSI and Fiber Channel Storage Area Network (SAN) with access to over 40 terabytes of RAID 5
and 6 storage. Processing tasks are assigned to systems based on parallelization and floating-point
calculation needs. On-site buffering at the data-loggers provide protection in case of short-term
network or hardware problems, while backup acquisition systems at the San Diego Supercomputer
Center and the DMC protect against catastrophic failure of the primary site. Configuration
management and monitoring of these systems is accomplished with open-source (Cfengine, Nagios,
Solaris Community Software) and commercial tools (Intermapper). In the evolution from a single
server to multiple virtualized server instances, Sun Cluster software was evaluated and found to be
unstable in our environment. Shared filesystem architectures using PxFS and QFS were found to
be incompatible with our software architecture, so sharing of data between systems is accomplished
via traditional NFS. Linux was found to be limited in terms of deployment flexibility and
consistency between versions. Despite the experimentation with various technologies, our current
virtualized architecture is stable to the point of an average daily real time data return rate of
92.34% over the entire lifetime of the project to date.

The Waveform Server: A Web-based Interactive Seismic Waveform Interface
Newman, R. L., Clemesha, A., Lindquist, K. G., Reyes, J., Steidl, J. H., Vernon, F. L. (2009)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 90 (52) Abstract IN41A-1113

Seismic waveform data has traditionally been displayed on machines that are either local area
networked to, or directly host, a seismic networks waveform database(s). Typical seismic data
warehouses allow online users to query and download data collected from regional networks passively,
without the scientist directly visually assessing data coverage and/or quality. Using a suite of
web-based protocols, we have developed an online seismic waveform interface that directly queries
and displays data from a relational database through a web-browser. Using the Python interface to
Datascope and the Python-based Twisted network package on the server side, and the jQuery Javascript
framework on the client side to send and receive asynchronous waveform queries, we display broadband
seismic data using the HTML Canvas element that is globally accessible by anyone using a modern
web-browser. The system is used to display data from the USArray experiment, a US continent-wide
migratory transportable seismic array. We are currently creating additional interface tools to
create a rich-client interface for accessing and displaying seismic data that can be deployed to any
system running Boulder Real Time Technology's (BRTT) Antelope Real Time System (ARTS). The software
is freely available from the Antelope contributed code Git repository.

Ground Truth Comparison of Sensor Orientation determined from Polarization Analysis of Large-eatthquake Body-was at USArray Seismic Stations
Astiz, L., Bytof, J., Vernon, F. L., Eakins, J. A., Busby, R. W. (2008)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 89 (53) Abstract S13B-1798

Polarization of teleseismic body-waves from large earthquakes (M > 7.3) recorded from April 2004 to
August 2008 at USArray stations are used to estimate the sensor orientation. Three-component
broadband recordings at over 500 sites are demeaned and band-pass filtered between 5 and 100 sec to
determine the polarization of the arriving wave at all USArray sites. We compute the
three-dimensional single value decomposition of say the arriving P-wave and compare the resulting
orientation to that of the theoretical plane wave approximation (i.e. azimuth and incidence angle)
to obtain the sensor orientation. We do this for body waves of events arriving from multiple
directions to obtain an average sensor orientation at each station. In addition, to take advantage
of the USArray deployment geometry, we determine an empirical polarization estimate for each event
from the robust stack of body-waves recorded at sites located within 150 km of the reference
station. This empirical estimate three dimensional single value decomposition is compared to that of
the reference station to determine the orientation of the sensor at the reference station for
multiple events. Given that since September 2007 ground truth sensor orientation is known at USArray
sites because the use of an Octans gyroscope to a level of +/- 0.5 degree, it is possible to test
the accuracy of the single station theoretical estimate and that of the nearest neighbor estimate
for different body-waves. We present the results of the polarization estimates with body waves of
large events that vary within +/-2 degrees for most stations when using the nearest neighbor
estimate compared to those of the measured ground truth sensor orientation. The single station
estimates variation is larger.

The EarthScope Array Network Facility: application-driven low-latency web-based tools for accessing high-resolution multi-channel waveform data
Newman, R. L., Lindquist, K. G., Clemesha, A., Vernon, F. L. (2008)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 89 (53) Abstract IN43A-1166

Since April 2004 the EarthScope USArray seismic network has grown to over 400 broadband stations
that stream multi-channel data in near real-time to the Array Network Facility in San Diego.
Providing secure, yet open, access to real-time and archived data for a broad range of audiences is
best served by a series of platform agnostic low-latency web-based applications. We present a
framework of tools that interface between the world wide web and Boulder Real Time Technologies
Antelope Environmental Monitoring System data acquisition and archival software. These tools provide
audiences ranging from network operators and geoscience researchers, to funding agencies and the
general public, with comprehensive information about the experiment. This ranges from network-wide
to station-specific metadata, state-of-health metrics, event detection rates, archival data and
dynamic report generation over a stations two year life span. Leveraging open source web-site
development frameworks for both the server side (Perl, Python and PHP) and client-side (Flickr,
Google Maps/Earth and jQuery) facilitates the development of a robust extensible architecture that
can be tailored on a per-user basis, with rapid prototyping and development that adheres to
web-standards.

Data Latency Characteristics Observed Through Diverse Communication Links by the EarthScope USArray Transportable Array
Vernon, F. L., Eakins, J. A., Busby, R. W. (2008)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 89 (53) Abstract G43B-07

The USArray Transportable Array has deployed over 600 stations in aggregate over the past four
years. All stations communicate in near-real time using ip protocols over a variety of communication
links including satellite, cell phone, and DSL. Several different communication providers have been
used for each type of communication links. In addition, data are being acquired from several
regional networks either directly from a data server or after passing through the IRIS DMC BUD
system. We will present results about the latency of data arriving at the UCSD Array Network
Facility where the real time data are acquired. Under normal operating conditions the median data
latency is several seconds. We will also examine the data return rates through the near-real time
systems. In addition we will examine the statistics of over 36,000 events which have automatic event
locations and associations. We evaluate the timeliness of these results in the context of seismic
early warning systems.

The Python Interface to Antelope and Applications
Lindquist, K. G., Clemesha, A., Newman, R. L., Vernon, F. L. (2008)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 89 (53) Abstract G43A-0671

The Antelope Environmental Monitoring System from Boulder Real-Time Technologies, Inc.
(http://www.brtt.com) is widely used for acquiring, processing, distributing, and archiving
near-real-time monitoring data, especially in seismological networks. We have contributed a new
Python interface to the Antelope toolkit, paralleling other commercial and open-source language
interfaces in Matlab, PHP, TCL/Tk, and C. The Python programming language (http://www.python.org) is
well suited both to scientific computing applications and to interactive web-based applications. In
the latter, Python serves as the programming interface through which to connect to standardized
open-source frameworks. Community development of these frameworks has advanced in parallel
with cross-browser standardization and increasing broadband data transfer rates, making web-based
applications the defacto standard for platform-agnostic access to large, heterogeneous datasets.
These web-based solutions are starting to mirror some of the capabilities of standard desktop-based
applications. We describe the functionality of the new Python interface to Antelope, applications of
the interface to the interactive exploration of time-series data on the web using the Twisted
open-source framework, and web-based prototype tools developed for the Earthscope Array Network
Facility to provide community access to network monitoring and seismic event datasets.

The Earthscope USArray Array Network Facility (ANF): Metadata, Network and Data Monitoring, Quality Assurance as We Start to Roll
Eakins, J. A., Vernon, F. L., Astiz, L., Martynov, V., Mulder, T., Cox, T. A., Newman, R. L., Davis, G. A., Battistuz, B. (2008)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 89 (53) Abstract G43A-0665

The Array Network Facility (ANF) for the Earthscope USArray Transportable Array seismic network is
responsible for: the delivery of all 400+ Transportable Array stations to the IRIS Data Management
Center, collection of regional network stations which contribute data to the Transportable Array;
station command and control; verification and distribution of metadata (~560 current and former TA
stations as of September 2008); providing interfaces for personnel at the Array Operations Facility
(AOF) to access state of health information; and quality control for all data. To meet these goals,
we use BRTT's Antelope software package to: facilitate data collection and transfer; generate and
merge station metadata; monitor real-time datalogger state-of-health; and review seismic events.
Weekly transfers of dataless SEED and Virtual Network Definitions (VNDs) are simplified by the use
of ORB transfer technologies at the ANF and receiver end points. Extensions to the Antelope software
package have been contributed to help with data center operations. Additional software packages
including Dartware's InterMapper network monitoring application and Round Robin Database Tool
monitor and report on hardware or communications failures. The on-going quality control process
includes: 1) automatic event processing followed by daily analyst review associating arrivals
against available regional network bulletins (36000+ events and 1.9 million picks); 2) review of
clock quality and error; 3) review of number of mass recenters; 4) review of percent of time any of
the three mass positions are out of range; 5) alarms upon datalogger reboots; 6) alarms upon active
pumps; and 7) review of calibration signals at each station upon installation and prior to removal.
Much of this information is available via interactive online tools at the ANF website
(http://anf.ucsd.edu).

Integrating EarthScope Data Into Interactive Visualizations, Movies and High-Resolution Static Images
Kilb, D. (2008)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 89 (53) Abstract ED21C-01

What is EarthScope? The answer to this question can best be addressed through images, movies and
interactive visualizations. Using these types of visual tools the temporal evolution and spatial
scales of the various EarthScope data (e.g., earthquakes, sediment thickness, aquifers, focal
mechanisms, topography, moho depth, mines, geology, magnetics, faults and gravity) can be more
easily understood. Working with EarthScope researchers we have developed visualizations to assist
with data quality (i.e., from SAFOD, USArray and PBO), hypothesis testing and the presentation of
final results. Through this process we have identified 6 key areas of interest: (1) Depicting
temporal evolution of data; (2) The ability to toggle on/off and color-code data sub-sets for
complex high-density data; (3) Developing end-products that can be used as on-line supplements to
journal articles; (4) Creating multi-use end-products that benefit researchers, emergency response
personnel and education programs; (5) Quality assessing and geo-referencing newly collected data;
and (6) Making difficult subjects more understandable. The visualizations we create can be accessed
from our website (we get ~4,000 unique visitors to our pages each month) through the visual objects
library at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography's Visualization Center
(http://siovizcenter.ucsd.edu/library.php). These include 3D interactive visualizations, Quicktime
movies and online tools and can be explored using freeware that runs on multiple platforms (e.g.,
Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, SGI Irix).

Real-time operation of the NSF EarthScope USArray Transportable Array
Astiz, L., Eakins, J., Vernon, F. L., Martynov, V., Newman, R. L., Cox, T., Mulder, T. L., Busby, R. W. (2007)
Eos Transactions AGU, General Assembly Meet. Suppl. 88 (23) Abstract S34A-01

The Transportable Array (TA) component of USArray uses real-time telemetry to send data to the Array
Network Facility (ANF) through a variety of satellite, mobile phone, wireless and wired
communication links. The ANF is responsible for the timely delivery of metadata and waveform data to
the IRIS DMC from the growing number of Transportable Array stations. The IRIS DMC makes these data
available to the research community. The network has increased in size to 327 stations with 259
out of the 400 new TA sites installed (as of 28 February 2007). Starting in Fall 2007, equipment
will start to roll from current stations to new locations to the east of the current footprint. Use
of the Antelope software package has allowed the ANF to maintain and operate this extremely
dynamic network configuration, facilitating the collection and transfer of data, the generation and
merging of the metadata as well as the real-time monitoring of state of health of TA station
data-loggers and their command and control. Four regional networks (ANZA, BDSN, SCSN, and UNR) as
well as the USNSN contribute data to the Transportable Array in real-time. Although the real-time
data flow to the IRIS DMC has been 93.4% over the last year, the ANF and the TA field teams have
extended every effort and have managed to recover an additional 4.8% by recovering data from the
local data storage device (Baler 14) at each station. Once the missing data is recovered, we then
generate station-channel-day volume seed files, which are resent to the DMC to bring the total data
recovery rate to 98.4%. The total network uptime is above 99%. Analyst review of automatic
locations for the USArray network is being done at the ANF as part of the data quality monitoring
strategy. All events are associated with the USGS and regional network bulletins. As of
February 2007, around 13,000 weekly picks are being fully reviewed by analysts at the ANF and over
19,000 events have been recorded. We find a small percentage (about 10 %) of events that cannot be
associated with existing bulletins. This information is used by the regional network operators to
help them determine which TA stations may be beneficial to permanently add to their seismic
networks. Operation of the USArray at the ANF has benefited by the real-time interface with the ORB
and the Datascope database using PHP for display on the ANF website (http:anf.ucsd.edu) to provide
station and system state-of- health information to field teams. Information available for all
stations includes: location, maps, photographs, equipment deployed, communications, distribution of
events recorded by each station, and displays of daily, weekly, and yearly state of health
parameters as well as station noise spectra generated by the DMC.

Web-based tools for real-time assessment of Earthscope's Transportable Array state-of- health: integration of the Antelope Real Time System, RRDtool, AJAX and PHP
Newman, R. L., Lindquist, K. G., Vernon, F. L., Davis, G. A., Eakins, J., Astiz, L. (2007)
Eos Transactions AGU, General Assembly Meet. Suppl. 88 (23) Abstract S23A-03

Over the past three years the Array Network Facility (ANF) has developed a robust, extensible
web-based toolkit for monitoring the state-of-health of Earthscope's Transportable Array. The tools
are constructed within a framework of the Antelope Real Time System (ARTS) and the Antelope
interface to the PHP Hypertext Processor (PHP), an inline scripting language. Exporting data from
Datascope databases and Object Ring Buffer (ORB) packets into XML allows comprehensive client-side
interaction via Asynchronous Javascript And XML (AJAX) calls. Navigating and displaying the
resultant XML Document Object Model (DOM) trees are done using eXtensible Stylesheet Language
Transformation (XSLT) and PHP's built-in DOM classes. Tools include regional and individual station
and event maps, state-of-health statistics, waveform plots, and datalogger monitoring. Combined with
real-time graphing of state-of-health parameters from status ORB packets using Round Robin Database
Tool (RRDtool), this toolkit allows analysts, station engineers, scientists, and the general public
to view, assess, interact with, and download data collected from the 250+ stations in
the Transportable Array seismic network. Tools are available at the Array Network Facility website,
http:anf.ucsd.edu.

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Advances in web-based visualization of the state-of-health of Earthscope's Transportable Array: webdlmon
Newman, R. L., Lindquist, K. G., Vernon, F. L., Davis, G. A., Eakins, J., Astiz, L. (2007)
Earthscope 2007 Meeting, Monterey, California

The Earthscope Transportable Array has increased in size over the last three years to over 250
broadband seismic stations. Critical real-time assessment of datalogger state-of-health information
and data transfer metadata is fundamental to maintaining a healthy network. Providing this
information to analysts, station engineers, administrative staff, researchers and the public is the
responsibility of the Array Network Facility (ANF). Various interconnected software packages
(including the Antelope Environmental Monitoring System, Round Robin Database Tool, Generic Mapping
Tools, MATLAB) and web services (including Nagios and Flickr) build data products in near real-time
that are organized and integrated into the ANF website using XML, Javascript, and PHP.
These metadata and data products are readily accessible via the world-wide-web at
http://anf.ucsd.edu. This poster will highlight recent advances in web-based tool development,
including an XML-based Datalogger Monitor (dlmon) that is integrated with real-time graphing
capabilities.

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The EarthScope USArray Array Network Facility (ANF): Metadata, Network and Data Monitoring, and Quality Assurance
Eakins, J., Vernon, F. L., Martynov, V., Astiz, L., Newman, R. L., Cox, T. (2007)
Earthscope 2007 Meeting, Monterey, California

As we begin our fourth year of operations, the Array Network Facility (ANF) for the EarthScope
USArray Transportable Array seismic network has continued the timely delivery of metadata and
waveform data from the growing number of Transportable Array stations. The network has increased in
size to 307 stations with 244 out of the 400 new TA sites installed (as of February 2007). Starting
next spring, equipment will start to roll from current stations to new locations to the east of
the current footprint. Use of the Antelope software package has allowed us to maintain and operate
such a dynamic network configuration, facilitating the collection and transfer of data, the
generation and merging of the metadata as well as the real-time monitoring of state of health of
TA station data-loggers and their command and control. Four regional networks (Anza, BDSN, SCSN,
and UNR) as well as the USNSN contribute data to the Transportable Array in real-time. Although
the real-time data flow to the IRIS DMC has been consistently above 90% in the last year, the ANF
has strived to recover the remaining 10% of data to the DMC by connecting to a data storage device
(Baler) at each station to generate day long seed files: automation of this process
is ongoing. Operation of the USArray at the ANF has benefited by the real-time interface with the
ORB and the Datascope database using PHP for display on the ANF website (http://anf.ucsd.edu). A
recent feature in the website is round-robin database (rrd) plots allowing for scoping of individual
and grouped state of health parameters. Information available for all stations includes: location,
maps, photographs, equipment deployed, communications, distribution of events recorded by each
station, and displays of daily, weekly, and monthly station noise spectra as generated by the DMC.
Analyst review of automatic locations for the USArray network is being done at the ANF to monitor
data quality. All events are associated with the USGS and regional network bulletins. As of
February 2007, around 13,000 weekly picks are being fully reviewed by analysts at the ANF and over
19,000 events have been recorded. We find a small percentage of events that cannot be associated
with existing bulletins. This information is used by the regional network operators to help them
determine which stations may be beneficial to permanently add to their seismic networks.

Array Processing of Teleseismic Body Wave Phases Recorded by the Transportable Array
Pavlis, G. L., Vernon, F. L. (2007)
Earthscope 2007 Meeting, Monterey, California

Questions we addressed: * How can we use the TA for coherent wavefield processing? * What are the
limits of coherent processing? * How to adapt to standard methods? * What phases can be analyzed
this way? Issues: Standard plane wave methods used in array processing need to be adapted to
account for two fundamental issues with a broaband array the scale of the TA: 1. Alignment: we
cannot use the conventional plane wave approximation due to scale and large statics problems.
2. Data volume: the data volume is so large we need ways to automatically handle noisy and bad
stations

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EarthScope's Transportable Array: Advancing Eastward
Busby, R. W., Vernon, F. L., Newman, R. L., Astiz, L. (2006)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 87 (52) Abstract U41B-0820

EarthScope's Transportable Array has installed more than 200 high-quality broadband seismic stations
over the last 3 years in the western US. These stations have a nominal spacing of 70 km and are part
of an eventual 400 station array that migrates from west to east at a rate of 18 stations per month.
The full 400 stations will be operating by September 2007. Stations have a residence time of about 2
years before being relocated to the next site. Throughout the continental US, 1623 sites are
expected to be occupied. Standardized procedures and protocols have been developed to streamline all
aspects of Transportable Array operations, from siting to site construction and installation to
equipment purchasing and data archiving. Earned Value Management tools keep facility
installation and operation on budget and schedule. A diverse, yet efficient, infrastructure installs
and maintains the Transportable Array. Sensors, dataloggers, and other equipment are received and
tested by the IRIS PASSCAL Instrument Center and shipped to regional storage facilities. To engage
future geoscientists in the project, students are trained to conduct field and analytical
reconnaissance to identify suitable seismic station sites. Contract personnel are used for site
verification; vault construction; and installation of sensors, power, and communications systems.
IRIS staff manages permitting, landowner communications, and station operations and maintenance.
Seismic signal quality and metadata are quality-checked at the Array Network Facility at the
University of California-San Diego and simultaneously archived at the IRIS Data Management Center in
Seattle. Station equipment has been specifically designed for low power, remote, unattended
operation and uses diverse two-way IP communications for real-time transmission. Digital
cellular services, VSAT satellite, and commercial DSL, cable or wireless transport services are
employed. Automatic monitoring of status, signal quality and earthquake event detection as well as
operational alarms for low voltage and water intrusion are performed by a robust data
acquisition package. This software is coupled with a host of network management tools and display
managers operated by the Array Network Facility to allow managers, field personnel, and network
operations staff to visualize array performance in real-time and to access historical information
for diagnostics. Current data recording proficiency is 99.1%, with real-time telemetry averaging
about 91%. EarthScope, IRIS and the USGS are working with regional seismic network operators, both
existing and newly formed, to transition some of the Transportable Array stations into
regional network assets. Each region has unique circumstances and interested parties are invited to
exchange ideas on how this might be accomplished in their area. Contact busby@iris.edu for more
information.

Virtualization of Command and Control of Large-scale Observing Systems Using SOA (USArray Case Study)
Cotofana, C., Ding, L., Shin, P., Tilak, S., Fountain, T., Eakins, J., Vernon, F. L. (2006)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 87 (52) Abstract U41B-0817

Large-scale observing systems are poised to become the dominant means of study for a variety of
natural phenomena. These systems are comprised of hundreds to thousands of instruments that must be
queried, managed, and shared in a scalable fashion. Services-oriented architectures (SOAs) are
widely recognized as the preferred framework for building scalable and extensible
cyberinfrastructure. By applying SOA concepts, we created a framework for organizing observing
system resources and virtualizing command and control. We developed a suite of web services, custom
workflow applications, and an integrated user interface of monitors and controls for managing
instruments in large-scale sensor network observing systems. In particular, by virtualizing command
and control, were able to decouple deployment processes from the target computer hosting the sensor
network middleware, thus enabling more efficient administration. This poster illustrates our
approach and its application to the NSF EarthScope USArray large-scale seismic observing system.

The EarthScope USArray Array Network Facility (ANF): Metadata, Network and Data Monitoring, Quality Assurance During the Third Year of Operations
Eakins, J., Vernon, F. L., Martynov, V., Astiz, L., Newman, R. L., Cox, T., Foley, S. (2006)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 87 (52) Abstract U41B-0816

During the third year of operations, the Array Network Facility (ANF) for the EarthScope USArray
Transportable Array seismic network has continued the timely delivery of metadata and waveform data
from the growing number of Transportable Array stations. The network has nearly doubled in size over
the last year to 233 stations with 170 out of the 400 new TA sites installed (as of September 2006).
Use of the Antelope software package has allowed us to maintain and operate such a dynamic network
configuration, facilitating the collection and transfer of data, the generation and merging of the
metadata as well as the real-time monitoring of state of health of TA station data-loggers and their
command and control. Currently four regional networks (Anza, BDSN, SCSN, and UNR) as well as the
USNSN contribute data to the Transportable Array with additional contributions expected from UUSS
and the Montana Regional Seismic Network. Although the real- time data flow to the IRIS DMC has been
consistently above 90% in the last year, the ANF has strived to recover the remaining 10% of data to
the DMC by connecting to a data storage device (Baler) at each station to generate day long seed
files: automation of this process is ongoing. The results of this process will be presented.
Operation of the USArray at the ANF has benefited by the real-time interface with the ORB and the
Datascope database using PHP for display on the ANF website (http://anf.ucsd.edu). A recent
feature in the website is station grouping, by communication provider, network, and equipment
deployed at each site that helps to diagnose and reduce response time to operational problems.
Information available for all stations includes: location, maps, photographs, equipment
deployed, communications, distribution of events recorded by each station, and displays of daily,
weekly, and monthly station noise spectra as generated by the DMC is also available. Analyst review
of automatic locations for the USArray network are being done in quasi real-time at the ANF
to monitor data quality. All events are associated with the USGS and regional network bulletins. We
find a small percentage of events that cannot be associated with existing bulletins. The pick
information generated at the ANF for all USArray stations is made available as a basic product to
the scientific community and regional data centers. As of September 2006, an average of 10,000
weekly picks are being generated by analysts at the ANF.

Scientific Visualizations of Multidimensional Data Collected from Various Sensors
Samilo, D., Nayak, A. M., Kilb, D., Im, T., Vernon, F. L., Astiz, L., Eakins, J., Moschetti, M., Ritzwoller, M. H. (2006)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 87 (52) Abstract IN31A-1321

With the advances in the collection of greater quantities of higher caliber data, the field
geophysics demands a new device to appropriately synthesize and compare the continuously-incoming
slew of heterogeneous datasets from various branches of earth science. These data include
earthquakes, sediment thickness, focal mechanisms, topography, tomography, Moho depth, aquifers,
mines, geology, magnetics, faults, gravity, and photo-imagery. Due to the terminology,
domain knowledge, and file formats associated with each data type and respective sub-discipline, the
coherent translation of the data made accessible for all involved parties of researchers becomes a
difficult task. Herein, interactive 3D visualizations succor in advancing comprehension
of interdependencies between datasets, even manifesting never-before-seen relations previously
masked by directly interpreting raw data. One such example would be the examination of Californian
fault systems. To assay the discrete intricacies of fault systems, we use 3D visualizations
to posit representations of first motion mechanisms as sets of dual nodal planes (strike & dip) into
a geographically-bound environment; once this is accomplished, a mere visual inspection yields the
identification of certain regions as of high fault complexity (e.g., Coalinga, the San Jacinto
fault) and of relative fault simplicity (e.g., Parkfield). These visualizations can be appended with
imagery from earthquake locations (lat, lon, depth), surface fault traces, and seismic instrument
locations. Other projects include interpreting and using data recorded by the USArray Transportable
Array network to generate temporal snapshots of how surface wave tomography derived from
ambient seismic noise has evolved with the expansion of the sensor network. Likewise, these
"snapshots" can be visualized to produce stunning presentations. Visualizations such as the
aforementioned are available to the public through download at the Scripps Visualization
Center's visual objects library (http://siovizcenter.ucsd.edu/library.php). This library includes 3D
interactive visualizations, Quicktime movies, and on-line tools. Please contact us at
vizinfo@ucsd.edu if you would like to collaborate on visualizing your geophysical data.

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Monitoring the Monitors: Assessing and Visualizing the State-of-Health of Earthscope's Transportable Array
Newman, R. L., Foley, S., Davis, G. A., Lindquist, K. G., Vernon, F. L., Eakins, J., Astiz, L. (2006)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 87 (52) Abstract IN23A-1213

The Earthscope Transportable Array has increased in size over the last three years to over 200
broadband seismic stations. Assessing the state-of-health of the station equipment, collecting data
transfer metadata, and providing this information to analysts, station engineers, administrative
staff, researchers and the public is the responsibility of the Array Network Facility (ANF). Various
interconnected software packages (including the Antelope Environmental Monitoring System, RRD, GMT,
MATLAB, Nagios and Flickr) build data products in near real-time that are organized and integrated
into the ANF website using PHP (a web-based scripting language embedded in HTML). These metadata and
data products are readily accessible via the world-wide-web at http://anf.ucsd.edu, where multiple
web-based tools have been developed to display and visualize these products.

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Virtualization and Federation of Multiple Real-time Observatories Through the ROADNet Point of Presence
Lindquist, K. G., Vernon, F. L., Hansen, T. S., Rajasekar, A., Orcutt, J., Foley, S., Davis, G. A., Terrill, E., Otero, M. (2006)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 87 (52) Abstract IN23A-1211

Recent progress on the Antelope interfaces to the Storage Resource Broker and on the deployable
ROADNet Point Of Presence ("RPOP") has allowed three real-time observatories to be federated for
virtual access to ROADNet image and meteorological data, coastal ocean current-monitoring data, and
hundreds of gigabytes of USArray seismic data. The new Antelope-SRB Strdisp utility allows
interactive review of waveform data from these data sources, with observatory-grade tools, on any
computer with internet access, sufficient bandwidth, and system authentication. Similarly, the new
Antelope-SRB Strexcerpt utility allows arbitrary subset databases of waveform data to be extracted,
via simple or complex queries, and downloaded to the researcher's machine in any of approximately
20 user-specifiable formats. Key parts of the Antelope interface for PHP have been extended to the
Antelope-SRB interface, providing web-scriptable world-wide-web access to these datasets. Similarly,
key parts of the Antelope Toolbox for Matlab have been ported to the Antelope-SRB interface, making
these large, federated data sets accessible to researchers for custom interactive exploration and
processing based on their individual research needs. We end by discussing ongoing work on
generalized remote database exploration and analysis tools for Antelope-SRB virtualized data sets.
We also discuss the Antelope-SRB ORB (Virtual-ORB) interfaces in the RPOP cyberinfrastructure node.

An SOA-based Framework for Instrument Management for Large-scale Observing Systems (USArray Case Study)
Cotofana, C., Ding, L., Shin, P., Tilak, S., Fountain, T., Eakins, J., Vernon, F. L. (2006)
Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Web Services

Large-scale observing systems are poised to become the dominant means of study for a variety of
natural phenomena. These systems are comprised of hundreds to thousands of instruments that must be
queried, managed, and shared in a scalable fashion. Services-oriented architectures (SOAs) are
widely recognized as the preferred framework for building scalable and extensible
cyberinfrastructure. By applying SOA concepts, we created a framework for organizing observing
system resources. Guided by this framework, we developed web services, custom workflow
applications, and an integrated user interface of monitors and controls for managing instruments in
large-scale sensor network observing systems. In this paper we present our approach and discuss its
application to the NSF EarthScope USArray large-scale seismic observing system.

USArray Applications of Antelope PHP web technologies: ANF.UCSD.EDU
Newman, R. L., Lindquist, K. G., Vernon, F. L., Eakins, J., Hansen, T. S., Davis, G. A., Foley, S., Astiz, L. (2006)
Eighteenth Annual IRIS Worskhop, Westward Look Resort, Tucson, AZ, June 2006

The Array Network Facility website (http://anf.ucsd.edu) displays a variety of diverse meta-data
associated with the USArray Transportable and Flexible Arrays. A suite of online tools has been
developed to allow visual and interactive exploration of the data and meta-data from the array
stations. The website is partitioned into public and administrative areas. The public area provides
dynamic maps of station locations, along with network affiliations, communication providers,
hardware configurations, associated latencies and event maps. The public pages also show waveform
data returned for the last 1, 2 and 24 hours. This allows rapid assessment of array health from
anywhere with internet access. Graphical representations of state-of-health parameters are
generated nightly for each station, creating a searchable archive. The station maps and metadata
details are fully dynamic, updating immediately based on changes in the underlying databases and
streaming data returned. The password-protected administrative area provides access to a searchable
database of station-maintenance email from field personnel, filed by station, as well as upload and
search facilities for digital photos of field sites integrated with the Flickr photo-sharing
facility at http://www.flickr.com. The underlying architecture of this dynamic environment is the
Datascope RDBMS, part of the Antelope Environmental Monitoring System (http://www.brtt.com), in
combination with the PHP Hypertext Processing (PHP) scripting language. This configuration provides
an easily extensible platform for real time environmental monitoring, with many
re-usable components. We present the various types of data available from the ANF website, in
addition to simple descriptions of how these data were collected and displayed. We also outline
upcoming tools that we are currently developing to improve monitoring as this already large array
continues to grow.

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The Earthscope USArray Array Network Facility (ANF): Metadata, Network and Data Monitoring, Quality Assurance During the Second Year of Operations
Eakins, J., Vernon, F. L., Martynov, V., Newman, R. L., Cox, T., Lindquist, K. G., Hindley, A., Foley, S. (2005)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 86 (52) Abstract S33B-0327

The Array Network Facility (ANF) for the Earthscope USArray Transportable Array seismic network is
responsible for: the delivery of all Transportable Array stations (400 at full deployment) and
telemetered Flexible Array stations (up to 200) to the IRIS Data Management Center; station command
and control; verification and distribution of metadata; providing useful remotely accessible world
wide web interfaces for personnel at the Array Operations Facility (AOF) to access state of
health information; and quality control for all data. To meet these goals, we use the Antelope
software package to facilitate data collection and transfer, generation and merging of the metadata,
real-time monitoring of dataloggers, generation of station noise spectra, and analyst review
of individual events. Recently, an Antelope extension to the PHP scripting language has been
implemented which facilitates the dynamic presentation of the real-time data to local web pages.
Metadata transfers have been simplified by the use of orb transfer technologies at the ANF
and receiver end points. Web services are being investigated as a means to make a potentially
complicated set of operations easy to follow and reproduce for each newly installed or
decommissioned station. As part of the quality control process, daily analyst review has highlighted
areas where neither the regional network bulletins nor the USGS global bulletin have published
solutions. Currently four regional networks (Anza, BDSN, SCSN, and UNR) contribute data to the
Transportable Array with additional contributors expected. The first 100 stations (42 new Earthscope
stations) were operational by September 2005 with all but one of the California stations installed.
By year's end, weather permitting, the total number of stations deployed is expected to be around
145. Visit http://anf.ucsd.edu for more information on the project and current status.

Improvements to Web Toolkits for Antelope-based Real-time Monitoring Systems
Lindquist, K. G., Newman, R. L., Vernon, F. L., Hansen, T. S., Orcutt, J. (2005)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 86 (52) Abstract IN13A-1081

The Antelope Environmental Monitoring System (http://www.brtt.com) is a robust middleware
architecture for near-real-time data collection, analysis, archiving and distribution. Antelope has
an extensive toolkit allowing users to interact directly with their datasets. A
rudimentary interface was developed in previous work between Antelope and the web-scripting language
PHP (The PHP language is described in more detail at http://www.php.net). This interface allowed
basic application development for remote access to and interaction with near-real-time data through
a World Wide Web interface. We have added over 70 new functions for the Antelope interface to PHP,
providing a solid base for web-scripting of near-real-time Antelope database applications.
In addition, we have designed a new structure for web sites to be created from the Antelope
platform, including PHP applications and Perl CGI scripts as well as static pages. Finally we have
constructed the first version of the dbwebproject program, designed to dynamically create and
maintain web-sites from specified recipes. These tools have already proven valuable for the creation
of web tools for the dissemination of and interaction with near-real-time data streams from
multi-signal-domain real-time sensor networks. We discuss current and future directions of this work
in the context of the ROADNet project. Examples and applications of these core tools are elaborated
in a companion presentation in this session (Newman et al., AGU 2005, session IN06).

Applying a toolkit for dissemination and analysis of near real-time data through the World Wide Web: integration of the Antelope Real Time System, ROADNet, and PHP
Newman, R. L., Lindquist, K. G., Hansen, T. S., Vernon, F. L., Eakins, J., Foley, S., Orcutt, J. (2005)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 86 (52) Abstract IN13A-1078

The ROADNet project has enabled the acquisition and storage of diverse data streams through seamless
integration of the Antelope Real Time System (ARTS) with (for example) ecological, seismological and
geodetic instrumentation. The robust system architecture allows researchers to simply network data
loggers with relational databases; however, the ability to disseminate these data to policy makers,
scientists and the general public has (until recently) been provided on an 'as needed' basis. The
recent development of a Datascope interface to the popular open source scripting language PHP has
provided an avenue for presenting near real time data (such as integers, images and movies) from
within the ARTS framework easily on the World Wide Web. The interface also indirectly provided the
means to transform data types into various formats using the extensive function libraries that
accompany a PHP installation (such as image creation and manipulation, data encryption for
sensitive information, and XML creation for structured document interchange through the World Wide
Web). Using a combination of Datascope and PHP library functions, an extensible tool-kit is being
developed to allow data managers to easily present their products on the World Wide Web.
The tool-kit has been modeled after the pre-existing ARTS architecture to simplify the installation,
development and ease-of-use for both the seasoned researcher and the casual user. The methodology
and results of building the applications that comprise the tool-kit are the focus of this
presentation, including procedural vs. object oriented design, incorporation of the tool-kit into
the existing contributed software libraries, and case-studies of researchers who are employing the
tools to present their data.

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iCluster : Visualizing USArray data on a scalable high resolution tiled display using the OptIPuter
Nayak, A. M., Vernon, F. L., Kent, G., Orcutt, J., Kilb, D., Newman, R. L., Eakins, J., Smarr, L., DeFanti, T., Leigh, J., Renambot, L., Johnson, A. (2005)
GEON 3rd Annual National Meeting on Research Frontiers in Cyperinfrastructure

A 16.4 megapixel display wall has been constructed at the Array Network Facility (ANF) in the Cecil
H. & Ida M. Green Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) for the display of multiple
interactive visualizations of various geophysical datasets. This system is designed through
collaboration between major NSF funded projects such as OptIPuter and USArray (Earthscope), and will
allow researchers to access large stores of data on remote servers using dedicated links, visually
analyze data and present results at extremely high resolution. The system is nicknamed iCluster and
will be scaled to a 50 megapixel display as the USArray (currently about 80 stations) expands its
operations. The OptIPuter project (www.optiputer.net) leverages the capabilities of dedicated
optical networks that interconnect instruments, processors, computer storage and visualization
resources to aid in Earth Sciences research. The iCluster comprises a cluster of three Apple Power
Mac G5 machines and four Apple 30" LCD screens (of maximum resolution 2560 x 1600 each) tiled to
form a 2x2 array and is the first tiled display built using Apple hardware (to our knowledge). The
Antelope software is used for seismic data monitoring and archiving along with web-based analytical
tools developed at the ANF (http://anf.ucsd.edu/). OptIPuter visualization software (developed by
the Electronic Visualization Laboratory, University of Illinois at Chicago) such as JuxtaView (an
image viewer for interacting with remotely located extremely high resolution 2D images) and
Vol-a-Tile (interactive volume rendering software allowing navigation into gigabyte-sized seismic
volumes) will also be used. Interactive visualizations created by scientists at IGPP that overlay
heterogeneous datasets such as seismic profiles, geology strata, earthquake locations, bathymetry
and high resolution satellite imagery and aerial photos, using the Fledermaus software can also be
viewed. The configuration of each cluster node is: dual CPU 2.5 GHz PowerPC G5, 8 GB RAM, 500 GB
disk space, NVIDIA Ultra 6800 GeForce card, and the nodes are interconnected over gigabit Ethernet.
This system will also be part of the OptIPuter infrastructure, with fiber connections to the
OptIPuter CAVEwave on the National Lambda Rail. The design of the system is based on the Geowall-2
class of displays and the OptIPuter Visualization Cluster at Scripps. More information about this
system is available at (http://www.siovizcenter.ucsd.edu/icluster/index.html).

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VORBrouter: A dynamic data routing system for Real-Time Seismic networks
Hansen, T. S., Lindquist, K. G., Vernon, F. L., Orcutt, J. (2004)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 85 (47) Abstract SF41A-0749

For anyone who has managed a moderately complex buffered real-time data transport system, the need
for reliable adaptive data transport is clear. The ROADNet VORBrouter system, an extension to the
ROADNet data catalog system [AGU-2003, Dynamic Dataflow Topology Monitoring for Real-time Seismic
Networks], allows dynamic routing of real-time seismic data from sensor to end-user. Traditional
networks consist of a series of data buffer computers with data transport
interconnections configured by hand. This allows for arbitrarily complex data networks, which can
often exceed full comprehension by network administrators, sometimes resulting in data loops or
accidental data cutoff. In order to manage data transport systems in the event of a network failure,
a network administrator must be called upon to change the data transport paths and to recover the
missing data. Using VORBrouter, administrators can sleep at night while still providing 7/24
uninterupted data streams at realistic cost. This software package uses information from the
ROADNet data catalog system to route packets around failed link outages and to new consumers in
real-time. Dynamic data routing protocols operating on top of the Antelope Data buffering layer
allow authorized users to request data sets from their local buffer and to have them delivered
from anywhere within the network of buffers. The VORBrouter software also allows for dynamic routing
around network outages, and the elimination of duplicate data paths within the network, while
maintaining the nearly lossless data transport features exhibited by the underlying Antelope system.
We present the design of the VORBrouter system, its features, limitations and some future research
directions.

High resolution visualization of USArray data on a 50 megapixel display using OptIPuter technologies
Nayak, A. M., Vernon, F. L., Kent, G., Orcutt, J., Kilb, D., Newman, R. L., Smarr, L., DeFanti, T., Leigh, J., Renambot, L., Johnson, A. (2004)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 85 (47) Abstract SF13A-0713

A 50 megapixel display wall is under construction at the Cecil H. & Ida M. Green Institute of
Geophysics and Planetary Physics (IGPP) for the display of multiple interactive 3D visualizations of
various geophysical datasets. This system is designed through collaboration between major NSF funded
projects such as OptIPuter and USArray (EarthScope), and will allow researchers to visually analyze
data and present results at extremely high resolution. The OptIPuter project (www.optiputer.net)
leverages the capabilities of dedicated optical networks that interconnect instruments, processors,
computer storage and visualization resources to aid in Earth Sciences research. This
system comprises a cluster of seven Apple Power Mac G5 machines and twelve Apple 30" LCD screens (of
maximum resolution 2560 x 1600 each) tiled to form a 4x3 array and will be the first Apple-driven
tiled display to our knowledge. The Antelope software will be used for seismic data monitoring and
archiving along with web-based analytical tools developed at the Array Network Facility (ANF
http://anf.ucsd.edu/) at IGPP. OptIPuter software (developed by the Electronic Visualization
Laboratory) such as JuxtaView (an image viewer for interacting with remotely located extremely
high resolution 2D images) and Vol-a-Tile (interactive volume rendering software allowing navigation
into gigabyte-sized seismic volumes) will also be used. Interactive visualizations created by
scientists at IGPP that overlay heterogeneous datasets such as seismic profiles, geology strata,
earthquake locations, bathymetry and high resolution satellite imagery and aerial photos, using the
Fledermaus software will also be viewed. The configuration of each cluster node is: dual CPU 2.5 GHz
PowerPC G5, 8 GB RAM, 500 GB disk space, NVIDIA Ultra 6800 GeForce card, and the nodes are
interconnected over gigabit Ethernet. This system will also be part of the OptIPuter infrastructure,
with fiber connections to the OptIPuter CAVEwave on the National Lambda Rail. The design of the
system is based on the Geowall-2 class of displays (http://www.geowall.org) and the OptIPuter
Visualization Cluster at Scripps (http://www.siovizcenter.ucsd.edu/optiputer/index.html).

USArray Array Network Facility (ANF): Metadata, Network and Data Monitoring, and Quality Assurance During the First Year of Operations
Eakins, J., Vernon, F. L., Martynov, V., Newman, R. L., Foley, S. (2004)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 85 (47) Abstract S53B-0210

The deployment of Transportable Array stations for the EarthScope USArray project has begun and will
ramp up to 400 real-time telemetered stations over the next four years. The role of the Array
Network Facility (ANF) in the USArray project is to guarantee delivery of all Transportable Array
stations (400) and telemetered Flexible Array stations (200) to the IRIS Data Management Center,
ensure proper calibration and metadata are always up to date, and provide quality control for
all data. In support of these goals, we use the Antelope software package to facilitate data
collection and transfer, generation and merging of the metadata, monitoring of dataloggers,
generation of noise spectra, and analyst review of individual events. The SRB, and a newly
developed Antelope/SRB interface, is used for off-site backup of the data. A freeware package,
Nagios, adapted to include Antelope plug-ins, as well as newly developed in-house tools allow
network and data flow monitoring. Quality control checks include: daily review by an analyst to look
for obvious discrepancies in channel polarization or change in noise characteristics; associations
made against regional network and global bulletins to help spot timing errors; spectral noise
plots; and daily reports of outages and data gaps.

Web-based Data Mining to Systematically Determine Data Quality From the EarthScope USArray Seismic Observatory Project
Newman, R. L., Lindquist, K. G., Hansen, T. S., Vernon, F. L., Eakins, J., Foley, S. (2004)
Eos Transactions AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl. 85 (47) Abstract NG43A-0435

When fully operational, the Transportable Array (TA) and Flexible Array (FA) components of the
continent-scale EarthScope USArray seismic observatory project will provide telemetered real-time
data from up to 600 stations. By the fifth year of the deployment the predicted total amount of data
production for the TA and FA will be approximately 1500 Gb/yr and approximately 1000 Gb/yr
respectively. In addition to delivering the data to the IRIS Data Management Center (DMC) for
permanent archiving, the Array Network Facility (ANF) is charged with real-time data
quality control, calibration, metadata storage and retrieval, network monitoring and local
archiving. The Antelope real-time processing software provides the back-bone to this effort,
supported by the Storage Resource Broker data replication/archiving system and the Nagios network
monitoring tool. Real-time, web-based data mining, with support for multiple database schemas, is
provided by an Antelope interface to both Perl and PHP scripting languages. This allows embedding of
database functions in HTML. A suite of online tools allows query and graphical display of dynamic
real-time sensor network parameters such as data latency, network topologies, and data return rates.
Data and metadata are also web-accessible, for example XML trees of seismic data and
graphical display of instrument response functions. The purpose of these tools is to provide the
ANF, IRIS and end-users of USArray data with a real-time systematic method of determining data
quality for the spatio-temporal area of interest. The tools are accessible at http://anf.ucsd.edu